Breast Lift

Breast lift, or mastopexy, is a surgical procedure to lift and reshape sagging breasts.

Over the years, factors such as pregnancy, nursing, weight loss and the force of gravity take their toll on a woman’s breasts. As the skin loses its elasticity, the breasts often lose their shape and firmness and begin to sag.

A breast lift can create a more youthful appearance of the breast by positioning the nipple at a higher level. The areola, the darker skin surrounding the nipple is reduced in diameter as a result of this procedure. If your breasts are small or have lost volume after pregnancy breast implants alone may provide an ample lift to a deflated breast. For breasts with a greater degree of sagging insertion of a breast implant in conjunction with a mastopexy can improve both breast size and shape.

The breast lift procedure involves skin excision and reshaping of the breast and consequently does leave scars. In some cases a vertical mastopexy is performed, eliminating the unsightly inframammary scar.

A breast lift can be performed at any age, but plastic surgeons usually recommend waiting until breast development has stopped. Pregnancy and breast-feeding may have significant and unpredictable effects on the size and shape of your breasts. Nevertheless, many women decide to undergo breast lift surgery before having children and feel that they can address any subsequent changes later. Since the milk ducts and nipples are left intact, breast lift surgery usually will not affect your ability to breast-feed.

Breast lift surgery will make your breasts firmer and more uplifted. The position of your areolas and nipples will be enhanced, and the size of your areolas will be aesthetically pleasing.

The incisions from your breast lift surgery will heal and fade over time. It is important to realize, however, that the incision lines will be permanently visible. In some instances, they will eventually be only faint lines. Certain individuals may have incision lines that are more noticeable. Fortunately, the incisions for your breast lift are in locations easily concealed by clothing, even low-cut necklines.

  • Routine laboratory testing is performed and photographs are taken to assess post-operative effectiveness. Mammograms are ordered in all patients 30 years of age and over in order to detect any possible abnormalities and to serve as a baseline for postoperative comparison.
  • No aspirin, ibuprofen, or similar drugs should be taken within two weeks of surgery. These medications can cause serious excess bleeding during, and after, the operation. If you have any questions about drugs you are taking, including over the counter preparations and natural herbs, please call the office.
  • Do not eat or drink anything after midnight of the night before your surgery. This prohibition includes coffee and juice in the morning. Oral medications can be taken with a sip of water.

You will be seen pre-operatively and markings will be drawn on your chest to guide the surgery. This is one of the most important parts of the surgery so please be patient while they are drawn. You will then be brought into the operating room and given anesthesia. Incisions will be made along the marks.

The incision outlines the area from which breast skin will be removed and defines the new location for the nipple. When the excess skin has been removed, the nipple and areola are moved to the higher position. The skin surrounding the areola is then brought down and together to reshape the breast. Stitches are usually located around the areola, in a vertical line extending downwards from the nipple area, and along the lower crease of the breast.

Some patients, especially those with relatively small breasts and minimal sagging, may be candidates for modified procedures requiring less extensive incisions. One such procedure is the “doughnut (or concentric) mastopexy,” in which circular incisions are made around the areola, and a doughnut-shaped area of skin is removed.

If you’re having an implant inserted along with your breast lift, it will be placed in a pocket directly under the breast tissue, or deeper, under the muscle of the chest wall.

 
Information 
AnesthesiaGeneral.
Surgery Length3-5 hours
Side EffectsTemporary bruising, swelling, discomfort, numbness, dry breast skin. Permanent scars.
Recovery PeriodBack to work: 1 week or more. Strenuous activities: 1 month. Fading of scars: several months to a year.
Stay in Hospital1 day
Stay in Thailand14 – 17 days

Getting Back To Normal 

Healing is a gradual process. Although you may be up and about in a day or two, don’t plan on returning to work for a week or more, depending on how you feel. And avoid lifting anything over your head for three to four weeks. If you have any unusual symptoms, don’t hesitate to call your surgeon.

Your surgeon will give you detailed instructions for resuming your normal activities. You may be instructed to avoid sex for a week or more, and to avoid strenuous sports for about a month. After that, you can resume these activities slowly. If you become pregnant, the operation should not affect your ability to breast-feed, since your milk ducts and nipples will be left intact.

  • After surgery, you’ll wear an elastic bandage or a surgical bra over gauze dressings. Your breasts will be bruised, swollen, and uncomfortable for a day or two, but the pain shouldn’t be severe. Any discomfort you do feel can be relieved with medications prescribed by your surgeon.
  • Within a few days, the bandages or surgical bra will be replaced by a soft support bra. You’ll need to wear this bra around the clock for three to four weeks, over a layer of gauze. The stitches will be removed after a week or two.
  • If your breast skin is very dry following surgery, you can apply a moisturizer several times a day. Be careful not to tug at your skin in the process, and keep the moisturizer away from the suture areas.
  • You can expect some loss of feeling in your nipples and breast skin, caused by the swelling after surgery. This numbness usually fades as the swelling subsides over the next six weeks or so. In some patients, however, it may last a year or more, and occasionally it may be permanent.
  • Routine laboratory testing is performed and photographs are taken to assess post-operative effectiveness. Mammograms are ordered in all patients 30 years of age and over in order to detect any possible abnormalities and to serve as a baseline for postoperative comparison.
  • No aspirin, ibuprofen, or similar drugs should be taken within two weeks of surgery. These medications can cause serious excess bleeding during, and after, the operation. If you have any questions about drugs you are taking, including over the counter preparations and natural herbs, please call the office.
  • Do not eat or drink anything after midnight of the night before your surgery. This prohibition includes coffee and juice in the morning. Oral medications can be taken with a sip of water.

You will be seen pre-operatively and markings will be drawn on your chest to guide the surgery. This is one of the most important parts of the surgery so please be patient while they are drawn. You will then be brought into the operating room and given anesthesia. Incisions will be made along the marks.

The incision outlines the area from which breast skin will be removed and defines the new location for the nipple. When the excess skin has been removed, the nipple and areola are moved to the higher position. The skin surrounding the areola is then brought down and together to reshape the breast. Stitches are usually located around the areola, in a vertical line extending downwards from the nipple area, and along the lower crease of the breast.

Some patients, especially those with relatively small breasts and minimal sagging, may be candidates for modified procedures requiring less extensive incisions. One such procedure is the “doughnut (or concentric) mastopexy,” in which circular incisions are made around the areola, and a doughnut-shaped area of skin is removed.

If you’re having an implant inserted along with your breast lift, it will be placed in a pocket directly under the breast tissue, or deeper, under the muscle of the chest wall.

 
Information 
AnesthesiaGeneral.
Surgery Length3-5 hours
Side EffectsTemporary bruising, swelling, discomfort, numbness, dry breast skin. Permanent scars.
Recovery PeriodBack to work: 1 week or more. Strenuous activities: 1 month. Fading of scars: several months to a year.
Stay in Hospital1 day
Stay in Thailand14 – 17 days

Getting Back To Normal 

Healing is a gradual process. Although you may be up and about in a day or two, don’t plan on returning to work for a week or more, depending on how you feel. And avoid lifting anything over your head for three to four weeks. If you have any unusual symptoms, don’t hesitate to call your surgeon.

Your surgeon will give you detailed instructions for resuming your normal activities. You may be instructed to avoid sex for a week or more, and to avoid strenuous sports for about a month. After that, you can resume these activities slowly. If you become pregnant, the operation should not affect your ability to breast-feed, since your milk ducts and nipples will be left intact.

  • After surgery, you’ll wear an elastic bandage or a surgical bra over gauze dressings. Your breasts will be bruised, swollen, and uncomfortable for a day or two, but the pain shouldn’t be severe. Any discomfort you do feel can be relieved with medications prescribed by your surgeon.
  • Within a few days, the bandages or surgical bra will be replaced by a soft support bra. You’ll need to wear this bra around the clock for three to four weeks, over a layer of gauze. The stitches will be removed after a week or two.
  • If your breast skin is very dry following surgery, you can apply a moisturizer several times a day. Be careful not to tug at your skin in the process, and keep the moisturizer away from the suture areas.
  • You can expect some loss of feeling in your nipples and breast skin, caused by the swelling after surgery. This numbness usually fades as the swelling subsides over the next six weeks or so. In some patients, however, it may last a year or more, and occasionally it may be permanent.